25
September
2016

Dogs Left in Hot Cars - USA


Dogs left in hot cars - USA

I contacted the ASPCA (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals) for information about dogs being left in hot cars.

 

I hope this is useful to everyone that lives or is on holiday in the USA.

Information from the ASPCA
As many parts of the country struggle with recent heat waves, we’ve all seen the disturbing news reports of pets, mostly dogs, dying from heatstroke as a result of being left in parked cars.

Even on a relatively mild 85-degree day, it takes only 10 minutes for the interior of a car to reach 102 degrees—and within 30 minutes, the inside of the car can be a staggering 120 degrees.

Leaving windows open a few inches does not help.
Furthermore, when it comes to the body’s ability to cool itself, canine physiology is vastly different from that of humans. While humans have sweat glands all over our bodies that help regulate our body heat, dogs cool down mostly by panting, which is much less efficient than sweating. In only a short amount of time, a dog with a high body temperature can suffer critical damage to his nervous system, heart, liver and brain.

Many states and many municipalities have enacted laws to address the problem of animals left in cars in extreme temperatures. Under these laws, police, animal control agents, peace officers and others may be authorized to enter a vehicle by whatever means necessary to remove an animal.

If your state doesn't have a specific law addressing animals left in hot cars call your local law enforcement anyway, because it may be considered animal cruelty under your state or local laws.

If you’re out and about on a hot day and see an animal alone in a car, you should immediately try to find the car’s owner. If you have no luck, or if the owner refuses to act, contact local law enforcement and/or animal control.

 

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